Useful ALT Codes For Special Characters

Useful ALT Codes For Special Characters

AUTHOR:  JASON MORRELL 

Jason Morrell

You can use Alt codes in programs like Excel and Word to insert special characters such as £ (Alt 0163), © (Alt 0169), ° [degree symbol] (Alt 0176) and ½ (Alt 0189)

You can also use Alt codes to insert commonly used non-English characters that are not found on a standard US keyboard such as á ("a" with acute accent - Alt 160), ö ("o" with diaeresis - Alt 148), ñ (enye - alt 164) and ç (cedilla - Alt 135)

30 Excel Power Tips

FEATURE DOWNLOAD

Ever wondered how the experts get stuff done so quickly? Pro tips revealed.

1.  What is an ALT code?

Alt codes are based largely on ASCII, which stands for "American Standard Code for Information Interchange". Each ASCII code represents a different character. It was developed in the sixties as a standard character set for computers and electronic devices. The character sets used in modern computers, in HTML, and on the Internet, are all based on ASCII.

2. How to insert an Alt code

Just hold the ALT key and type the appropriate 3 or 4 digit code. Here are some of the more useful ones.

You must use the numeric keypad on the right hand side of an extended keyboard. Make sure that the NumLock is switched on. If you use the numbers along the top of the regular keyboard, you will inadvertently activate a tab, command or Quick Access function.

3. Currency Symbols

£  ALT + 0163
¥  ALT + 0165
¢  ALT + 0162
  ALT + 0128

4. Legal symbols

©  ALT + 0169
®  ALT + 0174
§  ALT + 0167
  ALT + 0153

5. Mathematical symbols

°  ALT + 248 / 0176
¹  ALT + 251
²  ALT + 253
³  ALT + 252
÷  ALT + 246
¼  ALT + 0188
½  ALT + 0189
¾  ALT + 0190
±  ALT + 0241

6. Chevrons

«  ALT + 174 / 0171
»  ALT + 175 / 0187

7. Diacritical characters (non-English letters not found on a standard US keyboard)

à  ALT + 0195
å  ALT + 0229
Å  ALT + 143
å  ALT + 134
Ä  ALT + 142
ä  ALT + 132
À  ALT + 0192
à  ALT + 133
Á  ALT + 0193
á  ALT + 160
  ALT + 0194
â  ALT + 131
Ç  ALT + 128
ç  ALT + 135
É  ALT + 144
é  ALT + 130
È  ALT + 0200
è  ALT + 138

Ê  ALT + 202
ê  ALT + 136
Ë  ALT + 203
ë  ALT + 137
Ï  ALT + 0207
ï  ALT + 139
Î  ALT + 0206
î  ALT + 140
Í  ALT + 0205
í  ALT + 161
Ì  ALT + 0204
ì  ALT + 141
Ñ  ALT + 165
ñ  ALT + 164
Ö  ALT + 153
ö  ALT + 148
Ô  ALT + 212
ô  ALT + 147

Ō  ALT + 229
ō  ALT + 228
Ò  ALT + 0210
ò  ALT + 149
Ó  ALT + 0211
ó  ALT + 162
Ø  ALT + 157
Ü  ALT + 154
ü  ALT + 129
Û  ALT + 0219
û  ALT + 150
Ù  ALT + 0217
ù  ALT + 151
Ú  ALT + 233
ú  ALT + 163
ÿ  ALT + 152

8. What next?

Please feel free to post any questions you have into the comments below. And before you leave this page, I want to give you one quick little action item! 

ACTION ITEM: Comment below with ONE thing you picked up from this post and share how it has helped, or will help, you. It's good to share your successes because it encourages others and provides an instant boost.

Enjoy the rest of your day!

Jason Morrell blog signature
About Jason Morrell

About the author

Jason Morrell


Jason loves to simplify the hard stuff, cut the fluff and share what actually works. Things that make a difference. Things that slash hours from your daily work tasks. He runs a software training business in Queensland, Australia, lives on the Gold Coast with his wife and 4 kids and often talks about himself in the third person!

SHARE

Suggested Posts

    • I’ve been on a hunt and I can’t find anything that works. The common suggestions are Alt + 2082 and Alt + 8322, neither of which works in Excel.

      The best suggestion I have is to highlight the ‘2’ then press ALt HFNB Enter. This is the keyboard shortcut to activate the Home ribbon, open the Format Cells dialog and check/tick the Subscript box. Alternatively, press Ctrl 1 then Alt B Enter.

      If anyone has the Alt Code and wants to claim the bragging rights, feel free to share!

    • Hi Fabio

      Approx – ALT 247
      Square Root – ALT 251
      Not equals – is usually ALT 2260 or ALT 8800 but some ALT codes including this one do not work in Excel.

      Other codes that you may find useful are:
      Similar – ALT 126
      Equivalent to – ALT 240
      Greater than or equal to – ALT 242
      Less than or equal to – ALT 243
      Infinity – ALT 236
      Pi – ALT 227

      You can also choose Insert | Symbol then change the subset to Mathematical Operators and insert the symbol manually.

      I hope that helps

  • {"email":"Email address invalid","url":"Website address invalid","required":"Required field missing"}
    Office Mastery
    >